Posts Tagged ‘Carol’

December 22, 2016

December 22, 2016

Everybody knows a turkey and some mistletoe, help to make the season bright! The word “mistletoe” derives from an Anglo-Saxon phrase meaning dung on a twig.  This stems from the fact that their seeds were often spread through the droppings of birds. The custom of kissing underneath mistletoe started in Victorian England, it traditionally, it was bad luck to refuse such a kiss.

Kissing boughs differ from mistletoe in appearance, but traditionally they had the same superstitions surrounding it. Although popular in England, were not present in Ontario during the 19th century.

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Kissing Bough hanging in the Henry House hallway

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December 16, 2016

December 16, 2016

With nine days until Christmas, days are often filled with songs about Santa, reindeer, Jesus’s birth, and winter wonderlands.  There are a number of carols with religious themes, like Angels We Have Heard On High, Away In A Manger, and O Holy Night, but then there are songs that are slightly more irreverent.

One such novelty song is All I Want for Christmas Is My Two Front Teeth.  In 1944, a man named Donald Yetter Gardner was teaching music at public schools in Smithtown, New York. He asked his second grade class what they wanted for Christmas, and noticed that almost all of the students had at least one front tooth missing as they answered in a lisp. He wrote the song in 30 minutes.

Let’s hope Grandma Got Run Over By A Reindeer has a less anecdotal origin!


From Wikipedia.

December 14, 2016

December 14, 2016

 

Canada’s oldest Christmas song is Huron Carol, believed to be written around 1642 by the French Jesuit missionary  Jean de Brébeuf at St. Marie Among the Hurons, near current day Midland, Ontario.  It was originally written in the Huron language, and the English version, “‘Twas in the moon of wintertime,” was written by Jesse Edgar Middleton in 1926. The tune is related to a 16th-century French song, “Une jeune pucelle.”