Posts Tagged ‘Trivia’

December 25, 2018

December 25, 2018

From the Oshawa Museum, we wish you and yours a very Merry Christmas and a wonderful Holiday Season!

Ever wondered how other countries around the world say Merry Christmas?

How do you say “Merry Christmas” around the World? (from http://tlc.howstuffworks.com/family/christmas-trivia3.htm)

  •  Glædelig Jul — Danish
  • Kung His Hsin Nien bing Chu Shen Tan — Chinese, Mandarin
  • Joyeux Noel — French
  • Nadolig Llawen — Welsh
  • Mitho Makosi Kesikansi — Cree
  • Buon Natale — Italian
  • Kala Christouyenna! — Greek
  • Nollaig Shona Dhuit — Gaelic (Irish)
  • Shub Naya Baras — Hindi
  • God Jul — Swedish
  • Boldog Karacsonyt — Hungarian
  • Feliz Navidad — Spanish
  • Pozdrevlyayu s prazdnikom Rozhdestva i s Novim Godom — Russian
  • Sung Tan Chuk Ha — Korean
  • Frohliche Weihnachten — German
  • Gesëende Kersfees — Afrikaans
  • Hyvaa Joulua — Finnish
  • Kurisumasu omedeto — Japanese
  • Mele Kalikimaka — Hawaiian
  • Suksun Wan Christmas — Thai
  • Wesolych Swiat Bozego Narodzenia — Polish
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From the Oshawa Museum’s Archival Collection

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December 20, 2018

December 20, 2018

December 20 is Go Carolling Day.

Is there a difference between a Christmas Carol and a Christmas Song? The simplest way to distinguish is that a carol is religious in nature and a song is secular.

If you’re planning on carolling today, you could sing Silent Night, which, according to Time Magazine, holds the record for the most recorded Christmas song with 733 copyrighted recordings since 1978.  Or, maybe you could sing Canada’s oldest carol Huron Carol, believed to be written around 1642 by the French Jesuit missionary  Jean de Brébeuf at St. Marie Among the Hurons, near current day Midland, Ontario.  It was originally written in the Huron language, and the English version, “‘Twas in the moon of wintertime,” was written by Jesse Edgar Middleton in 1926. The tune is related to a 16th-century French song, “Une jeune pucelle.”

If Christmas songs are more your style, Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer, or I Want a Hippopotamus for Christmas are great standards!

December 18, 2018

December 18, 2018

In the Christian faith, December 25 marks the birthday of Jesus, although many historians and scholars believe he was most likely born in the spring.  December was likely chosen to celebrate Jesus’s birth because Saturnalia, an ancient festival, falls near the winter solstice. This event, which lasted typically from December 17-23 (on the Julian calendar), celebrated the Roman god Saturn who is, amongst others, the god of wealth, agriculture, periodic renewal and liberation.  These celebrations often included feasting, gift giving, and our ‘modern’ tradition of decorating with greenery and lights, representing hope for rebirth in the spring, also has its roots in Saturnalia.

December 6, 2018

December 6, 2018

December 6, or December 19 for Eastern Christian countries, is the Feast of St. Nicholas.

St. Nicholas was a historic 4th-century saint and Greek Bishop of Myra in Lycia. He had a reputation for secret gift-giving, such as putting coins in the shoes of those who left them out for him.

Santa became popular in Christmas tradition when Sinter Klaus, Dutch for “Saint Nicholas,” was brought over by Dutch immigrants and they honored his death.  New York newspapers reported on this and his popularity grew!

Our common depiction of St. Nicholas may have been inspired by a poem!  In 1837, Clement C. Moore wrote his poem A Visit from St. Nicholas (commonly referred to as ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas), and in it, he describes Father Christmas as such:

He was dressed all in fur, from his head to his foot,
And his clothes were all tarnished with ashes and soot;
A bundle of Toys he had flung on his back,
And he looked like a pedler just opening his pack.
His eyes—how they twinkled! his dimples how merry!
His cheeks were like roses, his nose like a cherry!
His droll little mouth was drawn up like a bow
And the beard of his chin was as white as the snow;
The stump of a pipe he held tight in his teeth,
And the smoke it encircled his head like a wreath;
He had a broad face and a little round belly,
That shook when he laughed, like a bowlful of jelly.
He was chubby and plump, a right jolly old elf,
And I laughed when I saw him, in spite of myself;

St. Nicholas is the patron Saint of the Netherlands.

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December 1, 2018

December 1, 2018

One could theoretically plan a Christmas themed road trip around Canada.  Towns to visit include: Reindeer Station, NWT; Christmas Island, NS; Sled Lake, SK; Holly, ON; Noel, NS; Turkey Point, ON; and, Snowflake, MB.  It would be a long trip, mind, but it would be holly jolly indeed!